Mini Show

Wearable Works

12/27/18-1/06/19

meet the artists:

Eleonore Zurawski

Though still a student at Kent State University, Eleonore Zurawski experiments with a range of methods for the creation of her art. She combines photography, film, collage, laser cutting, fashion design and painting to fulfill her ideas. With an emphasis on documenting details and abstracting them through a chosen medium, to build a feeling, atmosphere and message. Eleonore is from Chicago Illinois and currently pursing a degree in Fashion Merchandising with a minor in Fine Arts. She expects to graduate in May 2019.

Kent State University // Fashion Merchandising & Minor in Fine Arts

Lucca Stream Kimono

40inx40in

2018

Mountain Side Dress

60in x 30in

2018

 
 

Mary Kay Palazzo

Kent State University /BFA in Crafts with a concentration in Jewelry and Metals and a minor in Nonprofit Studies

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Much of my inspiration for my work comes from studying human development, particularly early childhood and adolescent development. I am interested in the way that physical sensations, such as touch, sight, and sound, elicit nostalgia and comfort from viewers.

 

I believe that combining my work with imagery derived from toys such as colors or shape that carry nostalgia has a great impact on how one views the work. Because nostalgia is unique to each person, everyone will have a varying reaction towards that imagery, which pushes my work to become more personal.

 

It is my hope that when people view my work, they feel carefree, imaginative, and curious in the same way as they did when they played with their toys as children. My most recent work merges psychological concepts of learning through play with contemporary jewelry. Through combining sensory learning principles with visually stimulating forms and tactile materials used in children's toys, I am able to promote childlike interaction between the wearer and the piece.

 

I want an adult wearer of each piece to interact with it as a child would when playing with such toys that allow for assemblage, disassembly, and reconfiguration without the pressure of having to reach a certain outcome.

Untitled

5.75" x 4.5" x .75"

Untitled

32" x 15" x 2.5"

2018

 

Amanda Stumpf

Kent State University // BFA Crafts with a Concentration in Jewelry/Metals

Alchimia // MFA in Contemporary Jewelry and Body Ornament

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I make contemporary art jewelry to express myself as an artist but also as an individual. I make large contemporary pieces that combine fashion, design, art, and jewelry skills together. When I design a piece I think about how not only it will look and feel on the body but how it would look with an outfit. I am inspired by everything around me. I use a wide range of materials, but my favorite materials to use are alternative materials. I incorporate alternative materials like bugs, teeth, and bones to bring the grotesque element to life. Sometimes I cast these elements out of metal to have a different effect on the work. I use a different facility than other jewelers because my work tends to be larger and more on the side of wearable sculpture than jewelry, so I started to use an actual foundry to do my metal casting. This in turn gives my work yet another element that makes it different than other jewelry artists and brings in an element of industry. I strive for my art to be original, one of a kind, and something no one has ever seen or thought of before.

Left:

Untitled

2018

Middle:

Lepidoptera

2016

Right:

Ring 1

2018

Left:

Ring 2

2018

Middle:

Earing Set

2016

Right:

Ring 3

2018

 

Erica Hoosic

 University of Akron // BFA in Metalsmithing

Kent State University // MFA Jewelry/ Metals/ Enameling 

The environments I create function as statement jewelry to bring attention to the fragility of ecosystems. In my pieces I aim to create organically assembled “natural” objects from ephemeral and found objects like plastic vegetation, dolls eyes, little bits of packaging plastic, records, plastic caps etc. I manipulate and morph these products so that they are abstracted from their original function, using them like un-molded clay. Wearing a fragile ecosystem can dictate the gestures of the wearer making them more conscious of their movements and how they are existing while wearing the environments. I imagine a future where foliage replaces the gem stone and plastic waste rebuilds nature after extinction.

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